5 Stress Reduction Tips To Help You Avoid Holiday Burnout

Posted Posted in Interesting, You Can Fix That

The festive season is here and for many people, stress, depression and anxiety can make this season anything but merry. Here’s 5 stress reduction tips to help you avoid burnout during the holidays:

 

  1. Lower your expectations. The holidays are so exciting! Being with loved ones, decorations, lights, presents and much feasting! As the holiday approaches, expectations increase as to how the holiday will be only for them to be dashed when the holidays arrive. So, try not to place high expectations on how events will unfold. Always expect the unexpected and remember that humans can react unpredictably and surprisingly. Also, life can throw us the odd curve ball, especially when we least want it, so just have a “what will be will be” attitude and hopefully, the holidays will be perfect. Avoiding high expectations means you won’t become stressed out or upset should things not turn out the way you wanted.

 

  1. Plan ahead. Make a detailed plan for all of the things you need to do. Be thorough and try to do as much in advance as possible. The more you can get done before the holidays the less stressful the season will be. Include shopping, decorations, wrapping, meal preparation, sending cards, visiting family, and a schedule for the big day. This will help you get organized so you’ll get more done and you’ll feel less stressed. Make checklists so you can mark progress as you go. Another great tip is to have a backup plan in case things go awry.

 

  1. There’s a lot of work that needs to be done to ensure happy holidays. The holiday dinner alone really can be hard work for the cook! Too much work leads to stress burnout so make sure the whole family share the workload. Delegate by sharing chores among the whole family and get children involved too. It’s true – many hands make light work – and they also reduce stress in doing so.

 

  1. As much as the holidays are about spending time with family, having the family over can be highly stressful. Not all families get along, and stress levels can soar at get-togethers. If you have family members who are unappreciative, argumentative, aggressive, sulky – the kind of people who will spoil the day, then say “no!” and don’t invite them. The holidays are about joy and happiness, so inviting people who will ruin everyone’s day isn’t on. But a sense of duty can lead to inviting someone around against your better judgement. Your only duty is to your immediate family – your spouse and your children – not to any other family members. If your family get along, fine, but if you know there’s going to be fireworks, then make everyone’s day by not having stress as an unwanted holiday guest.

 

  1. Set your budget and stick to it. It’s really tempting to spend money during the holidays and many people will rack up huge debts doing so. The debt then becomes a major stress factor after the holidays have ended. You don’t need to buy people expensive gifts and you don’t need to go into debt to impress people. The Internet is a fantastic source for finding creative and imaginative gifts that will give the receiver a highly valued special surprise because it shows thoughtfulness. Debt is to stress what pizzas are to waistlines and you can pay a heavy price for impressing people with gifts. Stick to your budget and you will reduce stress, not just over the holidays but for many months after.

 

Hypnosis and Mindfulness practice are great tools in helping you cope with and enjoy this holiday season.  A clinical session with me is a great gift to yourself and will help you reach your goal in 2019.  Click or Tap the Contact Tab above to get you feeling amazing.

About the Author:

Marc is an award winning, certified stage and clinical hypnotist, author and motivational speaker with experience entertaining both large and small gatherings.

Marc uses his skills and talents in a variety of areas that include self-improvement or clinical hypnosis, motivational speaking, and comedy stage hypnosis.  He has worked with individuals and corporations throughout the United States to improve outcomes in personal lives and organizations.

As a clinical hypnotist, he has helped people resolve sleep issues, lose weight, stop smoking, deal with long held fears, deal with stress and anxiety, manage pain, improve sports performance, eliminate addictions, and improve sexual function.

His performance resume includes appearances on live shows for Refinery29 Live and Elite Daily’s TrashED.  He has performed internationally for major corporations, at comedy clubs, fairs and , and for schools, proms, graduations, conferences, conventions and corporations.

Marc’s book, “Staying in the Moment – Helping Students Achieve More Through Mindfulness Meditation” helps educators, parents and students get better results in the classroom through the adoption of mindfulness exercises as part of the curriculum.

For more information about, or to book an appointment with Marc visit his website: www.hypnomarc.com or email info@hypnomarc.com.

 

How Hypnotherapy Helps With Stress And Anxiety

Posted Posted in Interesting

Stress can be defined as a state we experience when there is a mismatch between perceived demands and our perceived ability to cope. Stress can also be defined as an adaptive response by a body to change in the environment. Stress response evolved to enable humans to deal with life-threatening dangers or stressors such as being confronted with a wild animal or perhaps a hostile human. Situations like this required action – the activation of stress response to wither stay and fight or to run away.

Today we hopefully won’t have to face the same dangers as our ancestors but the stress response to demanding situations we face is still with us and our mind and body still prepare for fight or flight when confronted with this equivalent of the wild animal. This is where the problem may begin as activation of the fight or flight response with no physical outlet, such as if we are stuck in a traffic jam and can’t fight it or flee it, or maybe an unfair confrontation in the workplace where once again the response for action may be triggered but we can’t vent it by fighting or running away without consequences we would rather avoid. Perhaps both of these events and more are experienced on the same day, perhaps every day, and the stress builds within us until it can damage our health if a solution is not found

Stress isn’t always bad – the stress response was designed to help and protect us and some people even place themselves in stressful situations they know they can handle for excitement and ‘the rush’ as it is often called.

We all experience stress in different ways depending upon our personality type, conditioning and possible training also.

When we face a stressor but perceive we have the ability to deal with it successfully a feeling of success and achievement can be gained. Getting the balance right between good stress to motivate us and encourage us to grow, and our ability to cope with the stress is possibly the key to remaining healthy, positive and active in whatever arena of life we find ourselves.

Our ability to cope with stress can be affected by our diet and the intake of good substances that out body needs to remain strong and flexible and to repair itself when needed. Also we should avoid anything that could cause us to be more stressed or weaker such as drugs, alcohol, smoking etc.

Finally, stress can be external, some event or situation that is causing stress, or internal, attitudes or emotions that lead to stress (anxiety, guilt, low self-esteem, fear, etc.)

What is the Fight/Flight Response? Why do we still have it?

The ‘Fight or Flight Response’ is a physiological reaction and is the body’s response to a stressor.

Changes in hormones prepare a person to either stay and deal with a stressor or to take flight/run away. This immediate state of alarm is when the body prepares to take action, and in this state a person will be extremely alert to their surroundings but also very anxious and possibly unable to concentrate.

The body will slow down systems not vital in responding to the stressor, such as the digestive system, which is why a person in a fight or flight situation may have a dry mouth and a nervous/upset stomach. The body will make other preparations such as improved cooling for the body as more energy is used and this will result in perspiration.

The fight or flight response is a very old and very basic response and has been with us for a very long time. It was originally a response to danger that would prepare our ancestors to fight the wild beast or the enemy who might suddenly threaten or confront them, or to take flight and literally run away from the danger.

This response is triggered when we send a message of alarm to a part of the brain called the hypothalamus. This area of the brain will then send a signal to the glands to release adrenaline, cortisol and endorphin into the blood stream. Increased levels of adrenaline increase heart rate and blood flow which in turn brings extra oxygen and glucose to the muscles. Cortisol causes an increase in amino-acids and sugars in the blood. Amino-acids are crucial for the repair and recovery of damaged tissues which may occur under stress and the blood sugar adds to the availability of glucose (fuel) for the body.

The release of endorphin, which is a morphine like substance only more powerful, provides the body’s natural tranquilizing system. Pain is blocked and a feeling of euphoria may be experienced, both helping to get the body through the situation it may find itself in due to stress.

We still have this response, as it is still necessary to prepare and protect us in times of alarm, such as being involved in an emergency situation of any kind, or being confronted with any form of potentially life threatening danger.

Once the initial stages of this fight or flight response are over, a person will have a psychological reaction to the stressor which will be based upon many variables including, personality type, conditioning, age, physical and mental ability, and their knowledge relevant to the situation to be dealt with.

It is very often the resulting symptoms of this fight or flight response kicking in that we tend to call a panic attack. what actually happens is that we may be in a situation where we can’t fight or flight, such as a meeting or on a train, and so we become more and more anxious and may feel as though we will pass out, or be sick, or any one of a number of responses. What often happens then,is we find we have a desperate need to urinate, and that is another way the subconscious mind will sometimes attempt to gain our attention and force us to leave the arena in which we find ourselves at the time. It is normally the feeling of not being able to escape, and knowing that we might have this strong feeling to fight or flight that causes much of the anxiety and expectation of problems for most people who find they need help to overcome their problem.

Also, many people….no…that should be most people who suffer from panic attacks and anxiety will normally have the need for some obsessive-compulsive actions in their life…it can often be a type of coping, or controlling strategy.

Why hypnotherapy is totally different from any other form of therapy?

Hypnotherapy is different from any other form of therapy because of the way in which the therapy part happens while one is in hypnosis. Put another way, hypnotherapy is a very effective combination of hypnosis, a trance or altered state of mind and deep relaxation, and the chosen therapy, which might be for example; suggestion therapy, regression, ego states therapy, or neuro-linguistic-programming.

Hypnosis allows an individual to enter a state of deep relaxation which in itself is a very useful therapy for combating stress. It also allows one to become calm and focused, as all parts of the mind work together and concentrate on solving the problem at hand, and therefore making the very best use of the chosen therapy as it is applied.

Why hypnotherapy is so helpful in cases of stress, anxiety and panic attacks?

Hypnosis is a state in which the conscious critical faculty is temporarily suspended or distracted and in which all parts of the mind work in harmony for the good of the whole being.

When in hypnosis an individual can become very relaxed and at the same time very aware and ‘sharp’, mentally focused.

For the computer literate, I would liken hypnosis to the ‘safe mode’ on a computer, where if a part of the system is acting up or malfunctioning, placing the system in safe mode allows for investigation and repair to be carried out safely while minimizing the risk to the normal operating systems. In some sports it would be like a ‘time-out’, where all parts of the team come together briefly to review the current state of play, to identify where poor choices may have affected the outcomes and to choose a new strategy to move forward with.

In the normal whirl of life we seldom take a time out, or to go into safe mode to pull together our resources and to calmly take stock and plan our best way forward. Hypnosis then, is a safe, relaxing state in which we can let go the tensions in and around us for a short period, and in which, if we desire it, a skilled therapist can guide us through the stages of investigation, discovery, planning and repair we may need.

Hypnotherapy therefore provides relaxation (and clients of good therapists learn self-hypnosis so they can find this deep relaxation for themselves) and is therefore useful at even this basic level, as a kind of first aid. The good therapist will help the client to find any repressed emotions, triggers and false instincts from the past that are a kind of out-of-date, erroneous, or maybe just no longer wanted or needed programming, that loops around once triggered to cause us much anxiety and feelings of panic, but we often don’t know why. Following this, the wonderful power of hypnotic suggestion, and Neuro-Linguistic programming techniques will be used to provide new and efficient programming to support moves forward into a much more positive life with a better outlook on everything.

About the Author:

Marc is an award winning, certified stage and clinical hypnotist, author and motivational speaker with experience entertaining both large and small gatherings.

Marc uses his skills and talents in a variety of areas that include self-improvement or clinical hypnosis, motivational speaking, and comedy stage hypnosis.  He has worked with individuals and corporations throughout the United States to improve outcomes in personal lives and organizations.

As a clinical hypnotist, he has helped people resolve sleep issues, lose weight, stop smoking, deal with long held fears, deal with stress and anxiety, manage pain, improve sports performance, eliminate addictions, and improve sexual function.

His performance resume includes appearances on live shows for Refinery29 Live and Elite Daily’s TrashED.  He has performed internationally for major corporations, at comedy clubs, fairs and , and for schools, proms, graduations, conferences, conventions and corporations.  He was a featured performer for New Jersey’s premier First Night Celebration – First Night Morris for New Year’s Eve 2018.

Marc’s book, “Staying in the Moment – Helping Students Achieve More Through Mindfulness Meditation” helps educators, parents and students get better results in the classroom through the adoption of mindfulness exercises as part of the curriculum.

For more information about, or to book an appointment with Marc visit his website: www.hypnomarc.com or email info@hypnomarc.com.

NEWS FLASH – The Sky is Not Falling and Hypnosis is Safe! – Scintillating News Sells!

Posted Posted in Interesting, Proms & Graduations

NEWS FLASH – The Sky is Not Falling and Hypnosis is Safe! – Scintillating News Sells! 

Every few years, the news media jumps back on the ignorance band wagon and looks to demonize hypnosis and hypnosis shows.  And yet, I continue to be amazed by the media’s actions.  I really shouldn’t be, especially when we continue to see the media creating news, rather than objectively reporting it.

In the latest “Sky is Falling” reporting, we have the case of a young man at an after-prom event in Nebraska who is at the center of the story.  For those who may have missed it, the student volunteered to participate in a comedy hypnosis show that was part of a safe and sober after-prom event.  The news station posted a short video clip that shows the student falling to the floor.  It is clear in the video that this student did not strike his head, nor does it appear that he sustained any other injuries.   The student claims that he did not remember anything from the show and that he had a difficult time emerging from hypnosis.  He was later taken to the hospital where he was found to be uninjured, did not sustain a concussion and did not appear to be under the influence of any substances.

The parents, who were not present at the show, raise some questions regarding the appropriateness of having hypnosis show and the lasting impacts of the experience on their son.  These are common questions that hypnotists answer and ones that the news media chose to ignore in their reporting.

For many people, their exposure to hypnosis are what they see from Hollywood and do not at all represent the reality of what hypnosis really is.  In fact, if these facts were widely known, the mystique and excitement of the movie or TV show, would be crushed and a literary tool of suspense, and mystery would be gone.

So, the question really comes down to what is hypnosis?  Hypnosis is a naturally occurring state that each of us experiences on a daily basis.  It lies between the awake state and the sleeping state and characteristics of both, yet it is neither.  The use of the word “sleep” tends to lead people to mistakenly believe that the volunteer is asleep or unconscious.  Actually, the opposite is true.  Hypnosis is a state of super-focus and concentration where a person has engaged the power of the sub-conscience mind.  The hypnotized person is hyper-aware.  They hear everything around them, have all their senses, and will ignore those suggestions that are against their principles and moral beliefs.  Simply, a person in hypnosis will not do or say anything they would not do or say in their fully awake state.  This is 180 degrees from where Hollywood would like us to think about hypnosis. Often, Hollywood depicts hypnosis as a state where the person is being controlled by some Svengali-like character.  Plainly stated, it is not!   Yet, we want to be titillated and entertained.  Since most people don’t understand the workings of the human mind, directors and writers play on this ignorance and reinforce the stereotypes found In pop culture.    The hypnotist has no “super-powers”.  Rather, the trained hypnotist has studied the way the human mind works, the physiology of the brain and the mechanisms that aid a person’s path into the hypnotic state and works with those mechanisms to achieve the enhanced trance state.

Hypnosis is one of the most misunderstood conditions of the human mind.  It is for this reason that there are so many false accusations by an uneducated media and general public.  One of the most common myths is that of being stuck in hypnosis.  You can no more get stuck in hypnosis than you can get stuck in sleep.  Even if something were to happen to the hypnotist during a show or session, the hypnotized person would either spontaneously pop out of hypnosis or would enter into a natural sleep state and awaken as they would from any regular sleep.

In the most recent story that has been making the rounds, the volunteer says that he does not recall the events of the evening.  This too is very common in hypnosis and often depends on the depth of the trance state.  Since hypnosis involves the sub-conscious mind, it is common that a person is not consciously aware of the events.  There are therapeutic benefits of this state that the clinical hypnotist uses to achieve the important changes that the client is seeking.  In the case of the stage hypnotist, most will give a suggestion to help their volunteer remember and enjoy their time on the stage.  As with sleep or conscience states, the hypnosis state is not at a constant depth.  The depth achieved is the result of the state of receptivity of the client/volunteer, the process employed by the hypnotist, as well as the physical condition of the volunteer.

There are tremendous benefits of being in this state.  First, it is incredibly relaxing.  In a state of hypnosis, the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems are in a state of balance.  This helps to achieve the depth of relaxation that is difficult to achieve in other ways.  This is why people commonly see volunteers on stage slumping or seeming to “melt” out of their chairs.

Hypnosis is achieved through one of two mechanisms; fatigue of the nervous system or overload of the nervous system.  In the first instance, the hypnotist or hypnotherapist will generally employ a talk-based patter such as progressive muscle relaxation or having the person focus on too many items at the same time.

The second method, which often is the most dramatic looking, and which is a result of taking advantage of the body’s fight/flight/freeze mechanism, is commonly called an instant induction.  These are inductions that employ an arm-pull/drop, body-drop or similar physical movement that causes the firing of the amygdala.    While it looks dramatic, the hypnotist is using the volunteers’ body mechanics to achieve the result.  The force used is the same as shaking hands with someone.  It is a “split-second” induction that allows the trained hypnotist to insert a suggestion at the exact moment the sub-conscious mind is off balance and seeking direction.

Hypnosis is safe!  The news story plays on the ignorance of people with respect to the safety of hypnosis.  Hypnosis, when performed by a trained hypnotist, is safe for both therapeutic and entertainment purposes.  It is NOT mind-control.  People in a state of hypnosis are fully aware of what is going on around them and even what they are doing.  They have full free-will and can choose to not accept the hypnotist’s suggestion, just as easily as they choose to accept and act on it.  There is no feeling of hypnosis, but there is a feeling of relaxation, peace and calm.

Hypnosis is NOT mind-control!  Contrary to myth, Hollywood and media sensationalizing to sell more movies, books and papers, hypnotized volunteers will not do things that are against their morals or closely held beliefs.

I am not saying that the media is completely at fault for reporting on instances where the hypnotist has done something that resulted in an either performing an inappropriate or dangerous routine or has failed to properly instruct their volunteers to act in a safe manner.  In those situations where the problem is caused by hypnotists that are either poorly trained, ignore their training, or allow their egos to override their common-sense, it is critical that the light be shined on the event.  However, there is often a rush to judgement and a need to gain audience that is accomplished with “disaster” headlines and over-blown reporting.

I recently addressed this matter in my YouTube vlog (video blog) Hypnosis Hangout Episode 7 – Trouble Waking Up Hypnotists.  (link to VLOG – https://youtu.be/vV5lEFR4tLw )  In the video, I specifically call on hypnotists to take Immediate action to insure they are protecting their volunteers and performing age and venue appropriate skits.  In so doing, they help to eliminate the sensationalized claims and return the industry to the prominence of being a safe and highly sought after, premium entertainment experience.  Removing the opportunity for negative publicity improves demand for shows and removes fears created by Hollywood, stereo-typing, and a news media hungry for audience engagement.

For More Information be sure to email – show@hypnomarc.com

About the Author:

Marc is an award winning, certified stage and clinical hypnotist, author and motivational speaker with experience entertaining both large and small gatherings.

Marc uses his skills and talents in a variety of areas that include self-improvement or clinical hypnosis, motivational speaking, and comedy stage hypnosis.  He has worked with individuals and corporations throughout the United States to improve outcomes in personal lives and organizations.

As a clinical hypnotist, he has helped people resolve sleep issues, lose weight, stop smoking, deal with long held fears, deal with stress and anxiety, manage pain, improve sports performance, eliminate addictions, and improve sexual function.

His performance resume includes appearances on live shows for Refinery29 Live and Elite Daily’s TrashED.  He has performed at comedy clubs, the Monroe County Fair (MI), the Osceola County Fair (Kissimmee, FL), the Red River Valley Fair (Fargo, ND), and for schools, proms, graduations, conferences, conventions and corporations.  He was a featured performer for New Jersey’s premier First Night Celebration – First Night Morris for New Year’s Eve 2018.

Marc’s book, “Staying in the Moment – Helping Students Achieve More Through Mindfulness Meditation” helps educators, parents and students get better results in the classroom through the adoption of mindfulness exercises as part of the curriculum.

For more information about, or to book an appointment with Marc visit his website: www.hypnomarc.com or email info@hypnomarc.com.

Can Your Stuttering Be Helped with Hypnosis?

Posted Posted in Interesting, You Can Fix That

Can Your Stuttering Be Helped with Hypnosis?

For the person who stutters, the thought of having to speak in a meeting, in a classroom, or in a social situation can be paralyzing and produce incredible anxiety.  People who stutter and stammer tend to have greater difficulty as they get older and continue to negatively reinforce the negative loop of stutter, stammer, anxiety, embarrassment, and frustration that ultimately leads to a lowered self-esteem and in some cases, social isolation.

Stuttering is a speech disorder in which the normal flow of speech is disrupted by frequent repetitions or prolongations of speech sounds, syllables or words or by an individual’s inability to start a word. The speech disruptions may be accompanied by rapid eye blinks, tremors of the lips and/or jaw or other struggle behaviors of the face or upper body that a person who stutters may use in an attempt to speak.(htt5)

In a 2009 Australian study by Iverach, et al., concluded “stuttering appears to be associated with a dramatically heightened risk of a range of anxiety disorders.” (Lisa Iverach, 2009).  This finding is significant for a number of reasons including understanding of the looping of behaviors that compound one another.  I believe it is of particular interest to hypnotherapists because of the number of clinicians that use hypnotic interventions as a modality of reducing stress disorders of clients.  When applied to the stutter, it is reasonable to conclude that there will be an improvement in the quality of life in this client population.

The number of credible studies that seek to answer the question “Can Your Stuttering Be Helped with Hypnosis?”  has been very small when one considers the acceptance of hypnosis by the professional medical and psychological communities.  One particular study (Kaya & Alladin, 2012) did show results in improving outcomes employed hypnosis as part of the treatment protocol.  The unfortunate part is that this study was flawed in design.  The researchers used a number of methods in concert with one another to achieve their results.  Bodson and Roberts, (Roberts, 2014) in their article presented at the 2014 ISAD Conference fault this research and tend to agree with Kaya & Alladin, that “it is impossible to know which aspect of the treatment contributed most to the progress observed (Kaya & Alladin, 2012).”  Bodson & Roberts go onto cite claims made by the Banyan Hypnosis Center, either explicit or implied, as being curative for resolving stuttering.  In particular, the specifically fault the script entitled “Eliminating Stuttering.” (Banyan, n.d.)

In order to understand and establish realistic expectations for results, it is important for the hypnotist to fully understand the causes of the stuttering and when hypnosis is likely to be effective.  It is critical for the clinical hypnotist to not unreasonably raise expectations nor dash hopes and increase frustrations and reinforce the failure cycle that is typical in many other forms of management or remediation.

Generally, there are two distinct causes that result in stuttering/stammering.  The first are those conditions which can be characterized as neuro/physiologically based.  These are those resulting from conditions such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) or anomalies of the structural sound producing mechanism within the face, neck and throat.  The second basis are psycho/social causes that are often the result of [i] bullying, physical and/or psychological abuse by a parent, or another authority figure.  The emotional relationship is similar to other post-traumatic stress triggering events.

The focus of this article is on the latter as the memories and memory loops reside in the sub-conscious mind and hypnosis has been shown to be a successful intervention strategy in resolving emotional traumas.  Further, hypnosis can be characterized as a having similar benefits as solution focused brief therapy (SFBT)[1] in that it results in rapid change without the need to focus on the problem.  SFBT is based on a theoretical foundation that the client tends to be restricted in their view of the problem.  Their focus of the negative impact reinforces the negative loop responses that are consistent.  The language of problems tends to be different from the language of solutions. (Nichols, 2013)  And finally, “Problem talk” can be negative and set in the past; solutions is more hopeful and about the future.  (htt3)

Alison Nicholas, MSc., in a presentation to the 10th Oxford Dysfluency Conference (ODC), writes about the principles of SFBT as a treatment philosophy to resolve stuttering in children.  She notes the importance of establishing goals through a series of questions which focus on future outcomes as opposed to the current problems.   Her insight is one that is familiar to hypnotists. “Clients tend to frame their goals negatively” (Nicholas, 2015).  As hypnotists, we confront this situation and work to reframe reference and establish positively framed outcomes.  Further, we encounter clients who either through prior therapeutic interventions, or their own thinking, magnify the problem by repeatedly anchoring the negative emotions and behaviors.

The goal of the hypnotic intervention is to engage the client’s own resource states to create, reinforce and anchor the positive changes.  Stuttering that is based on psycho/social dynamics requires a restructuring of thought and experience that can be traced to the original sensitizing event(s).  Nicholas goes on to write a conclusion that could easily have come from a hypnotherapist:  “As solutions to a client’s presenting problem are constructed using the client’s own resources, the SFBT approach builds a client’s confidence and provides then with evidence that they have knowledge, resources, strengths, skills and abilities to make the necessary changes in their life. With this perspective, the child and parent are encouraged to take responsibility for change and develop their internal locus of control which has been found to be an important factor in maintaining progress following stuttering therapy for adults who stutter (Craig, Franklin, & Andrews, 1984; De Nil & Kroll 1995).” (emphasis added)

The 2014 ODC also offered another important paper that directly addresses the topic of using hypnosis as a modality for dealing with stuttering.  Although presented in abstract form, Zloof and Ezrati-Vinacour’s article Hypnosis as a Technique for the Treatment of Stuttering (Zloof, 2015) examined the impact of hypnosis through a combination implicit and explicit measures to determine whether a hypnotic intervention reduced symptom of stuttering.

The researchers employed an eight-session intervention that focused on ego strengthening, addressing past traumas, and empowering the client by improving their sense of control.  Clients’ stuttering was measured at the beginning and end of each session.

The results of this study showed that the severity of the stutter/stammer, when compared to the beginning of the session were reduced.  Additionally, the study also showed that some of the improvements were short-lived, while others lasted until the next hypnosis session.  The study also indicated that there was an improvement in the client’s feelings about their condition.  A broader discussion of these findings can be found in the International Society of Hypnosis’ Newsletter. (htt4)

The challenge for clinical hypnotists in addressing this, as well as other conditions, is in managing client expectations and ensuring that we not promise or imply results that are not supported by research and experience.  A review of current research faults the methodology used to support claims of either reduction in symptoms or complete cures.

There are other challenges to the research that needs to be addressed.  First, most studies on the subject tend to utilize small sample populations and fail to describe in detail the process employed.  The number of adult stutters as a percentage of the population is estimated during the hypnosis session(s).  Absent of replication in larger trials, claims of success are likely to be dismissed by the general speech therapy community.

This is not to say there is no benefit from hypnotic intervention.   Since research has shown there to be a strong relationship between anxiety disorders, as defined by DSM IV, and stuttering, it would be wise to focus our attention on resolving the anxiety issues through hypnotic intervention.   Changing the focus away from the dysfluency stops reinforcing the “problem” and begins to empower the taking back of control.

As with all forms of hypnotic intervention, the clinician should ensure they are functioning within the scope of their professional training.  It is helpful for hypnotists working with dysfluency to have an understanding of the mechanics of speech production and know the appropriate questions to ask.  Determining if the if the basis is generally neuro/physiological or psycho/social will directly impact the potential for success.  Hypnotist should consider working on dysfluency issues collaboratively with Speech Therapists for the greatest benefit of the client.

Hypnosis is a powerful tool to resolve a host of client centered issues that tend to be resistant to other therapies.  The greater acceptance of hypnosis as a mechanism to address the challenges of the stutter will require well designed studies with controls and the cessation of unsubstantiated, grandiose claims by hypnotherapists.  As hypnotists, we owe it to those who engage our services to be forthcoming, open and honest about what we can and cannot accomplish.  This raises the level of the science and practice and helps us to gain greater acceptance by the medical community, along who’s side we work for the benefit of the client.

Contact Marc today to schedule a no obligation phone consultation.

About the Author:

Marc is an award winning, certified stage and clinical hypnotist, author and motivational speaker with experience entertaining both large and small gatherings.

Marc uses his skills and talents in a variety of areas that include self-improvement or clinical hypnosis, motivational speaking, and comedy stage hypnosis.  He has worked with individuals and corporations throughout the United States to improve outcomes in personal lives and organizations.

As a clinical hypnotist, he has helped people resolve sleep issues, lose weight, stop smoking, deal with long held fears, deal with stress and anxiety, manage pain, improve sports performance, eliminate addictions, and improve sexual function.

His performance resume includes appearances on live shows for Refinery29 Live and Elite Daily’s TrashED.  He has performed at comedy clubs, the Monroe County Fair (MI), the Osceola County Fair (Kissimmee, FL), the Red River Valley Fair (Fargo, ND), and for schools, proms, graduations, conferences, conventions and corporations.  He was a featured performer for New Jersey’s premier First Night Celebration – First Night Morris for New Year’s Eve 2018.

Marc’s book, “Staying in the Moment – Helping Students Achieve More Through Mindfulness Meditation” helps educators, parents and students get better results in the classroom through the adoption of mindfulness exercises as part of the curriculum.

For more information about, or to book an appointment with Marc visit his website: www.hypnomarc.com or email info@hypnomarc.com.

Tags: hypnosis for stuttering, stuttering hypnosis, hypnosis stuttering, hypnotherapy for stuttering, stuttering hypnotherapy, hypnotherapy for stammering, stuttering, stammering, marc marshall, hypnomarc, hypnotherapy, nasw, national stuttering awareness week

 

[1] SFBT was developed by Insoo Kim Berg, Steve de Shazer

[i][i] ScienceDirect_articles_25Apr2018_16-18-34.138.zip/Hypnosis-as-a-Technique-for-the-Treatment_2015_Procedia—Social-and-Behavio.pdf

 

Myra S. Lockhart & Alan W. Robertson (2009) Hypnosis and Speech Therapy as a Combined Therapeutic Approach to the Problem of Stammering a Study of Thirty Patients, British Journal of Disorders of Communication, 12:2, 97-108, DOI: 10.3109/13682827709011314

 

Definition source https://epdf.tips/the-2002-official-patients-sourcebook-on-stuttering.html

 

(n.d.). Retrieved from https://prezi.com/sopr_hr1xlkr/compare-contrast-presentation/

(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.hypnoses.com/content/uploads/2017/09/ish-201509.pdf

(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.coloradostutteringtherapy.com/interesting-articles/

Banyan, C. (n.d.). Hypnosis School and Trainigng Center. Retrieved from Hypnosis Center: http://www.hypnosiscenter.com/hypnosis-scripts/hypnosis-script-stuttering-patter.htm

https://prezi.com/sopr_hr1xlkr/compare-contrast-presentation/. (n.d.).

Lisa Iverach, S. O. (2009). Prevalence of anxiety disorders among adults seeking speech therapy for stuttering. Journal of Anxiety Disorders.

Nicholas, A. (2015, July 17-20). Solution focused brief therapy with children who stutter. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences- 193, 209-216.

Nichols, M. (2013). Family Therapy: Concepts and Methods. In M. Nichols, Family Therapy: Concepts and Methods. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Roberts, B. &. (2014). ISAD. Retrieved from http://isad.isastutter.org/isad-2014/papers-presented-by/therapy-research-and-other-fun-things/the-web-of-false-claims-about-stuttering-cures/

Zloof, A. &.-V. (2015). Hypnosis as a Technique for the Treatment of Stuttering. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 193, 357.